YEAR Two pupils from Nene Infant School, Wisbech discovered what it would have been like to grow up in the Victorian era as part of their time travel project.

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Dressed as Victorian children and sporting period names, they visited Octavia Hill’s Birthplace House, where they were shown what life was like in poor accommodation before social housing reform.

The pupils were guided through a slum by a resident who lived in fear of her landlord, dangerous living conditions and unwelcome house guests.

Peter Clayton, chairman of Octavia Hill’s Birthplace House Trust, showed groups around models of social housing, explained the importance of the National Trust and shared why Octavia Hill’s work was important.

Class teacher Sally Kirby said: “It was a day in which the children of the Nene school could make a strong connection with very important local history, experiencing things in a very inclusive and interactive way.

“Having the knowledgeable staff on hand to further illustrate the exhibits and activities simply added to the atmosphere and effectiveness of the learning.

“The children have come away with a clear idea of what life was like for people in poor housing and why Octavia Hill’s work is as relevant and important today as it was back then.”

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