Wild sculpture trail at Anglesey Abbey

PUBLISHED: 14:40 29 October 2013 | UPDATED: 14:40 29 October 2013

Artist Jane Frost with a willow butterfly sculpture

Artist Jane Frost with a willow butterfly sculpture

Archant

A giant boiled egg and a swarm of enormous butterflies will form part of a wild sculpture trail on display at the National Trust’s Anglesey Abbey tomorrow,

The sculptures are the result of the a creative art project called Inside Out, for children with mental health problem,s supported by BBC Children in Need.

Inside Out is collaboration between the mental health charity, Arts and Minds, in partnership with the NHS Croft Child and Family Unit and the National Trust.

The Croft provides assessment and treatment for children with complex emotional, behavioural and social difficulties, and works intensively with parents to develop their parenting skills.

Between July and October, families and staff from The Croft visited Anglesey Abbey at Lode to work with Arts and Minds artist, Jane Frost, creating a unique collection of willow sculptures.

The sculptures will form part of a self guided Wild Sculpture Trail on Wednesday October 30. Creative sessions are also being held between 11am-1pm & 2-4pm, when visitors to Anglesey Abbey can have a go at creating their own sculptures.

Janet Jephcott, Anglesey Abbey’s community engagement officer, said: “Inside Out is just one example of the many local community projects Anglesey Abbey has initiated or participated in over the last ten years.

“Its part of our continued efforts to enable young people to get outdoors and engage with wildlife and nature in creative and practical ways”.

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