Grammy Award winners coming to Cambridge with innovative new show

16:54 04 August 2014

INALA a Zulu ballet

INALA a Zulu ballet

Archant

Grammy-award winning group Ladysmith Black Mambazo are coming to the Cambridge Corn Exchange as part of a unique collaboration with multi award-winning choreographer Mark Baldwin.

Created by a team that includes the talents of current and former members of the Royal Ballet, the ambitious new production – called INALA - embraces an exhilarating fusion of South Afrian and Western cultures, live on stage.

Winning their fourth Grammy Award this year, Ladysmith Black Mambazo first rose to worldwide prominence with Paul Simon’s Graceland album.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo blend the intricate rhythms and infectious harmonies of their native musical roots with live percussion, piano and strings.

Mark Baldwin’s richly choreography unites Zulu traditions with classical ballet and contemporary dance, performed by an exceptional company of 18 dancers and singers.

Encompassing South Africa’s past, its present and new hopes for the future, INALA delivers a spiritually uplifting and beautiful live story-telling experience, powered by a cultural explosion of music, song and dance.

See the show at Cambridge Corn Exchange on Saturday, October 4, from 8pm. Tickets, from £22/£25 , are available from the box office on 01223 357851.

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