Up and away - Wisbech lecture will tell the story of Duxford from 1917 to the present day

12:15 17 April 2014

Old aerial shot of Duxford

Old aerial shot of Duxford

Archant

An illustrated talk on the history of Duxford and its historical links will conclude the winter season of Wisbech Society lectures.

Peter MurtonPeter Murton

The talk will be given on Monday April 28 by Peter Murton, Resident Research Officer at IWM Duxford.

Mr Murton, a regular contributor to radio and television programmes, will tell the story to an audience at the Dwight Centre, Wisbech Grammar School from 7.30pm.

Established in 1917 for Royal Flying Corps aircrew training, Duxford became a Royal Air Force fighter station in 1924. It saw the formation of the first ever Spitfire squadron in 1938 and from July 1940 hosted 242 Squadron, commanded by famous ace Douglas Bader. Post-war, RAF Duxford became a jet base, with its last operational flight in 1961.

Looking for a site to store and display objects too large for its London facility, Imperial War Museum chose the abandoned airfield at Duxford in 1977 and today, IWM Duxford houses one of the finest aircraft collections in the world.

Non-members are invited to attend the lecture, for which Wisbech Society requests a donation of £3.00 or more.

For further information regarding the event or the society, contact Paul E Eden, Wisbech Society Press Officer, on publicity@wisbech-society.co.uk or go to www.wisbech-society.co.uk

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