The effect on our rural lifestyle of immigrants

PUBLISHED: 12:15 18 August 2006 | UPDATED: 22:07 28 May 2010

WE hear a lot via the media about immigration and its affect upon our country. Britain is experiencing the biggest wave of immigrants in its history. Viewing the local aspect we, living in the idyllic reaches of farmland, orchards and rivers, the free exp

WE hear a lot via the media about immigration and its affect upon our country. Britain is experiencing the biggest wave of immigrants in its history.

Viewing the local aspect we, living in the idyllic reaches of farmland, orchards and rivers, the free expression of beautiful skies, are being overlaid, if that's the right word, by our city cousins who have had enough of ever increasing stress of over-populated cities and large towns.

This tendency is viewed by some as so serious it will have devastating consequences for those born and bred in the countryside and affect the quiet and peaceful environment we so cherish.

According to a report more that 100,000 people chose to tear themselves from the rigours of city life and send down their roots in rural Britain. Suburbia and its demands are proving too much for them.

This is arguably the main reason that towns and villages in rural Britain, including the Fens, are deploying acres of land for substantial building projects. Enlarging towns in fact.

The general aim apparently is to accommodate arrivals on town perimeters, but nothing can be achieved without a price.

Adding to existing populations does not necessarily bring relief to townships, rather the contrary. Additional services must be provided and everyone must swallow the pill.

The tendency of inward immigration pushes up local house prices like never before making it practically impossible for young people to obtain a house of their own.

Inward immigration affects rural services, infrastructure and inflicts greater strain on countryside conservation.

In any case big towns can ill afford an exodus such as is taking place now, and the rural areas are experiencing pressure to contain floods of migrants from the cities. Key rural services are having pressure inflicted upon them and stress levels are rising where calm is an established feature and has been for centuries.

As in so many things the government has underestimated the consequences of tens of thousands of city people desperate to establish a life in rural bliss. For a number of reasons city life is becoming hell on earth.

This is all the more reason for local councils to practice restraint in allowing more and more houses to be built on the perimeters of tightly constricted infrastructure. Moderation is good in all things.

Urban living should be sustainable and communities regarded with a view to promote low impact on health and convenience, and, as someone has said, for everyone to enjoy without "loving the countryside to death".

The councils' object should be to take stock of environmental issues affecting the area it serves and improve services, convenience and privacy and not degrade and vulgarise the visual attractiveness and efficiency applicable to corporate and urban ideology.

TREVOR BEVIS

St Peter's Road

March

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