What’s so new about school gardens?

PUBLISHED: 12:15 18 August 2006 | UPDATED: 22:07 28 May 2010

I REFER to the article in the Cambs Times on July 14, headed The answer lies in the soil . Much is printed in local news papers about getting children to learn how to grow food. Why has this taken so long? Eighty-six years ago a small village school had

I REFER to the article in the Cambs Times on July 14, headed ' The answer lies in the soil'.

Much is printed in local news papers about getting children to learn how to grow food. Why has this taken so long?

Eighty-six years ago a small village school had a school garden 20 miles from March over the border in Norfolk. There was no fuss, supervised by the headmaster I shared a plot because my parents were leaving that village later in the year.

The first lesson took care of your tools, fork, spade and hoe. We learned how to keep them clean. We dug properly, as many pupils' parents were farm workers and so some knowledge was learned at home on the garden or even on the farm. Many took a lot of pride in their plot.

Not only the boys were taught for their future; the girls had cooking lessons. Some became well known for their cooking, trained by good cooks cooking wholesome home grown vegetables.

Take a look around or read about people reaching a great age these people were brought up on good wholesome food. There were no chemicals, very few nitrates and the soil was rich and well fed.

I wish the pupils of Westwood School success.

I B STARR

Boxgrove Close

Eye

Peterborough


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