Wind turbines - love them or loathe them

PUBLISHED: 11:35 01 February 2008 | UPDATED: 12:16 29 April 2010

My family and I have had to abandon our home 930 metres from turbines such as those at Whitemoor because of acoustic (heard) noise and low frequency (felt) noise. We abandoned our home because we were suffering from sleep deprivation and becoming depresse

My family and I have had to abandon our home 930 metres from turbines such as those at Whitemoor because of acoustic (heard) noise and low frequency (felt) noise.

We abandoned our home because we were suffering from sleep deprivation and

becoming depressed. This can be verified by our GP.

As a consequence there has been a lot of noise monitoring at our home since June 2006 and we can prove, and demonstrate that there are specific low frequency sound pressure waves that emanate from wind turbines.

Our whole noise issue is currently under investigation by the local Government Ombudsman.

We have also become aware of vibro-acoustic disease. We are in direct contact with Prof Alves-Pereira, and from that research we know that it is particularly those who

are vulnerable - the very young, the elderly or those with existing mental ill-health - who are particularly prone to further damage from low frequency sound waves.

Thus it may be that some of the prisoners may be more adversely affected by their close proximity to turbines than others.

Since abandoning our home we have reverted to our previously normal state of health.

The turbine developer for Whitemoor is the same as ours, and it now operates as Wind Prospect and 25 per cent of its currently operating sites have noise and

flicker issues.

Only five per cent of wind farms nationally have such problems, 20 wind farms in total. WP has five of these.

There is a dose response mechanism that is not yet fully understood and, most importantly, many countries insist on a two-kilometre buffer zone between turbines and any humans.

JANE DAVIS

Via e-mail

I REFER to last week's letter about the proposed wind turbine on Foundry Way, March.

Having lived in the shadow of the turbine on Longhill Road, I have never heard the 'thump' that was reported. I regularly walk my dog past this turbine in the day and at twilight - even while standing underneath the turbine I have yet to hear this noise.

I support the idea of this wind turbine on both a personal level and a national level. To me they are graceful and elegant. I would rather look out of my window and see a wind turbine rather than a nuclear power station or similar.

We all know about the drive for finding ecologically friendly and sustainable sources of power. If this is one way we in March can help Britain become more sustainable then I'm all for it. If having wind turbines in the area will help supply more energy to the national grid and so, in the long run, reduce the need for more power stations then as far as I'm concerned why have one when we have room for many more.

KIRSTY MILLAR-KENT

March

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