Why your actions can make difference

PUBLISHED: 14:36 05 October 2007 | UPDATED: 23:06 28 May 2010

Receiving the letters, e-mails and notes from readers who clearly care about our local environment and the wildlife that lives there never fails to fill me with hope and joy. Please keep them coming. Because of all this good feeling, it is always sad to h

Receiving the letters, e-mails and notes from readers who clearly care about our local environment and the wildlife that lives there never fails to fill me with hope and joy. Please keep them coming.

Because of all this good feeling, it is always sad to hear of the actions of a (much smaller) number of people who just don't seem to care at all.

I receive quite a bit of correspondence about neighbours with no regard for the natural environment, your gardens or wildlife in general.

Some relatives of mine have spent years building up a beautiful and impressive garden that is full of wildlife throughout the year and looks superb.

On one side it is supported by a garden where efforts have been made to plant native trees. Together the two gardens create a brilliant urban oasis for wildlife.

On the other side they have recently suffered the misfortune of having new neighbours who out of spite have taken to making a point of massacring any branch, leaf or stem that dares to encroach over the boundary fence to such an extent that mature cover, established for years, is in danger of being killed off completely.

Worst of all are the instances of actually reaching over, breaking the fence and cutting back and pulling up my relatives' plants on their side of the fence. Thus, ensuring their garden has nowhere whatsoever for wildlife to live, green things do not grow on their side and making sure they have no part in a beautiful, wildlife-friendly environment.

I know many of you are keen gardeners and do all you can to help wildlife, so a plea to keep up the good work, maintain your own 'green space' and keep up the fight on behalf of our wildlife.

Even actions down to the level of planting a single native shrub, some flowering plants for bees to feed from and allowing plants to seed and provide food for birds can make such a difference, particularly if we all make a point of doing something for wildlife in our gardens.

Tree protection orders, conservation areas, the Wildlife and Countryside Act and laws of trespass are there for a good reason and I am happy to help where I can with advice.

Don't forget to contact the council as well, as it has conservation specialists who can advise and help.

Converting those with no regard for wildlife and the environment is another matter though, but good luck.

Our wildlife would thank you if it could.

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