All Saints makes leap of faith to Academy status

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. Headteacher Rachel Beeson.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. Headteacher Rachel Beeson. - Credit: Archant

ALL Saints is celebrating after becoming the first inter-church primary school in Britain to switch to Academy status.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. - Credit: Archant

The move was made to preserve the unique flavour of the joint Catholic and Church of England school.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. - Credit: Archant

Headteacher Rachel Beeson said they made the change to ensure they stayed ahead of the game.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. Chair of Governors Jon Lynes.

All Saints' Inter-Church Academy. Chair of Governors Jon Lynes. - Credit: Archant

“We have a very distinctive ethos and we wanted to make sure it was protected and promoted,” she said.

“It’s hugely positive and has been done after extensive consultation with parents, teachers, children and governors.”


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Academy status means that money comes direct from the Government to the school, cutting out the local education authority, giving them the freedom to run the establishment as they see fit for the maximum benefit of the children, she said.

The paperwork to achieve academy status took seven months and was carried out with extensive support from St Bede’s inter-church secondary school at Cambridge.

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Working alongside them were members of a trust board comprising chairman of the governors Jon Lynes, the Ely Diocese financial board and the Catholic Bishop of Anglia.

The 220-pupil school is one of just 10 inter-church primaries in the country and the Academy switch includes the 60-strong pre-school playgroup.

Mr Lynes said: “We now have the independence to choose our suppliers and can plough savings back into the school for the benefit of the pupils.”

Year 5 student Grace Stratton, 10, said being an Academy had not changed day-to-day classes but would improve things for everyone as time went on.

Year 6 pupil Joey-Jade Stiff, 11, said: “It’s a really good opportunity for the school to become even better. Being an Academy sounds classy.”

Ten year old Year 5 student Archie Patterson said he hoped it would provide an opportunity to upgrade sports facilities and equipment.

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