Armistice Centenary

WITH Local Authorities having to plan for lean times ahead, is the upkeep of our ‘built heritage’ such as war memorials likely to be given priority status? Probably not.

WITH Local Authorities having to plan for lean times ahead, is the upkeep of our ‘built heritage’ such as war memorials likely to be given priority status? Probably not.

Although we continue to see the tragic consequences of war, it is difficult for us to visualise that nearly a century ago men - and some women - died in such vast numbers that they could not be returned to these shores. Memorials were the only way that a community could honour its dead and the very nature of any war memorial remains is local appeal and relevance. The time is right however to try to take a view of the big picture.

The Centenary of the Armistice on November 11, 2018 represents a fitting deadline by which Britain could boast a heritage of clean, readable and structurally sound war memorials in a way that shows future generations that we have truly ?not forgotten?

Serious money is needed nationally for, where necessary, structural repairs, stonework restoration, cleaning and re-engraving and ultimately this can only come from Government. Further improvements in lighting, seating, fencing and landscaping can help re-establish these fine structures in their role as a point for quiet contemplation in an increasingly hectic world.

Contact clean2018@hotmail.co.uk

RAY THOMPSON

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