Causeway Diner

WITH reference to the letter from Heidi Dungate (Standard 20/08/2010) She expresses indignation that her friend with the noisy and unruly children was asked not to come back to the Causeway diner.

WITH reference to the letter from Heidi Dungate (Standard 20/08/2010) She expresses indignation that her friend with the noisy and unruly children was asked not to come back to the Causeway Diner. She asks people to be prepared to put up with disruption and noise and bad behaviour because all of the children have mental problems (or rather a ‘syndrome’ as it’s more popularly called). She mentions that her friend asked diners why they were looking across, and that those questioned, looked away. Sounds innocuous enough, but I suspect and aggressive “what are *you* looking at” snarled across at anyone daring to want to eat a meal in peace, might intimidate them. Instead of Ms’ Mason and Dungate expecting everyone else around them to make allowances and put up with her children’s disruptive behaviour, she might have a little more concern for those who have paid for a meal and who might expect it to be eaten in a pleasant and peaceful ambience.

I have never visited this diner, but, since it seems I can be assured that I will be able to eat a meal without having other people’s loud and unruly children stressing me out, I shall make every effort to visit the place as soon as I am able. Why is it that other people’s offspring should be inflicted on others, however badly behaved they are (not their fault of course, they have a ‘syndrome’) and nobody should be allowed to make any kind of protest? I think I too have a ‘syndrome’. It manifests itself by me displaying a need for peaceful surroundings and scepticism for various ‘syndromes’ which are always suffered by children with mothers who won’t enforce discipline. Years ago, when parents were stricter, most of these ‘syndromes’ were treated with a swift increase of the blood flow to one or other of the buttock cheeks, administered by the left or right hand being placed sharply and firmly to said cheek. It seems that the heat and sting from this treatment, helped to alleviate behaviours arising from the ‘syndrome’. I myself, have a friend with similarly afflicted children. Indeed, they have an impressive number of ‘syndromes’, all known by an array of letters. Oddly enough though, their syndromes and symptoms disappear when they visit me. Mind you, I am a bit fierce. Comes of owning a pack of dogs and being used to barking orders and expecting obedience perhaps?

PAM THOMPSON

Via e-mail


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