CCTV used to monitor migrating fish

EXPERTS are making use of CCTV technology to monitor migrating fish numbers in a Cambridgeshire river. At Dog in a Doublet Fish pass on the River Nene near Whittlesey, fisheries staff have mounted a small digital camera underwater. The data is then reco

EXPERTS are making use of CCTV technology to monitor migrating fish numbers in a Cambridgeshire river.

At Dog in a Doublet Fish pass on the River Nene near Whittlesey, fisheries staff have mounted a small digital camera underwater.

The data is then recorded and hours of footage can be downloaded from the computer on site. Environment Agency staff then have the laborious task of watching the footage and noting down each fish that goes past.

The fish pass was built by the Environment Agency in 1994 to help fish in the river get past Dog in a Doublet sluice. By slowing the flow of water through a channel it enables fish to pass and complete their natural migration upstream.


You may also want to watch:


Previously they would have had to negotiate an alternative, more difficult, route under the sluice, and many would fail or be picked off by predators such as cormorants and otters.

Before the digital camera was installed, staff set traps to get an idea of how many and which species of fish were using it. Staff had to empty the traps and record the contents as often as six times a week.

Most Read

Today, information is downloaded from the site once a month and staff can record the numbers and species of fish from the comfort of their desks. Some of the fish that have already been caught on candid camera include roach, eel and some large specimens of pike.

Technical Specialist Chris Randall explains: "This new technology helps us to get a picture of the species and number of fish using the pass, an indicator of the quality of the health of the river.

"This is the first time locally the Environment Agency has made use of this CCTV technology to monitor fish numbers.

"It's important that we know how effective we are at protecting and improving our fisheries.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus