Cousins launch dual language books for children

Cousins launch a series of dual language books for eastern european children. Left: Kate Woods, Asta

Cousins launch a series of dual language books for eastern european children. Left: Kate Woods, Asta Siskiene and Carrie Norman. - Credit: Archant

TWO cousins have launched a series of dual language books to help young eastern European children with their reading skills.

Cousins launch a series of dual language books for eastern european children.

Cousins launch a series of dual language books for eastern european children. - Credit: Archant

Graphic designer Kate Woods and Carrie Norman, Vice-Principal of Peckover School, Wisbech, released the books after discovering there was little on the market to cater for the young readers.

Two sets of books have been published in Lithuanian with plans already in the pipeline for Russian, Latvian and Polish titles.

One book set is fiction with illustrated characters and fun stories while the other is based on the experiences of young Lithuanians moving to the UK.

Carrie, 46, of Upwell, a leading teacher for supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language [EAL] said: “I couldn’t find the books we needed to support our pupils.


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“Kate and I were at a ball in September and began discussing how we would love to write children’s books.”

Kate, 29, of Walpole St Andrew, a director of a marketing and printing company added: “It was at that point we realised we had the necessary skills between us to start a publishing company.”

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After planting the seed eight months ago, their business, Norman Woods Publishing, was born and the books came to fruition by being published last month.

Already the titles are attracting customers from all over the country including the distributor for national book store Waterstones.

Involving parents is the key motive for Bee Lingual books which focus on parent and child learning together.

Carrie said: “Valuing first language is key to helping students reach their full potential.”

Bilingual teaching assistant Asta šiškien?, who provided the translations for the Lithuanian books, commented: “Parents want to help with reading, but language is often a barrier so these books help bridge the gap.”

Find their books at www.beelingualuk.com

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