Death - happens to the best of us - informal cafe encourages people to stop treating it as a taboo topic

‘GraveTalk’ provides a café-style space where people can come and chat about death and dying, and th

‘GraveTalk’ provides a café-style space where people can come and chat about death and dying, and think about their funeral wishes. Revd Jenny Webb with some of the people that attended. Picture: Steve Williams - Credit: Archant

A cafe style event to help people think about death, dying and funerals came to March as part of a nationwide campaign to stop the subject being a taboo topic.

‘GraveTalk’ provides a café-style space where people can come and chat about death and dying, and th

‘GraveTalk’ provides a café-style space where people can come and chat about death and dying, and think about their funeral wishes. Picture: Steve Williams - Credit: Archant

GraveTalk provided a café-style space where people chatted about death and dying organised by the March Church of England Team Ministry.

Open to anyone of any faith or none people enjoyed a talk by Rev Jenny Webb alongside a cup of tea and a slice of cake.

Rev Jenny said: “Many of us are reluctant to talk about death, especially to those close to us, but it is important that we do consider these matters, so that our loved-ones know what our wishes are.

“GraveTalk aims to help people think about these issues in an informal setting over a cup of tea.”


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In 2009, the National Council for Palliative Care (NCPC) set up the Dying Matters Coalition to promote public awareness of bereavement.

Members include organisations from across the NHS, hospices, care homes, charities supporting old people, children and bereavement, social care and housing sectors.

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Also involved are a wide range of faith organisations, community groups, schools and colleges, academic bodies, trade unions, the legal profession and the funeral sector.

The group’s mission is to encourage a fundamental change in society in which dying is seen and accepted as the natural part of everybody’s life cycle.

A spokesman for the group said: “Our lack of openness has affected the quality and range of support and care services available to patients and families. “It has also affected our ability to die where or how we would wish.”

The Dying Matters Coalition is working to encourage people to talk about their wishes with friends, family and loved ones.

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