End of an era for Wisbech butcher’s shop that will close on Saturday after trading in the town for 107 years

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Left: David and Christine Williams. Picture

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Left: David and Christine Williams. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant

It’s the end of an era for a butcher’s that has been in the same family for 107 years.

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Picture: Steve Williams.

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant

Pork butcher GW Frank has been trading in Wisbech town centre since the early 1900s and until 20 years ago had a shop opposite March market place.

This Saturday it will open its doors for the last time after owners David and Christine Williams decided to retire.

Mr Williams, 61, said: “We have 10 loyal staff and a lot of great customers. We would like to say a big thankyou for everybody’s support over the years.

“The time has come to retire. One of our sons is a sports teacher at Wisbech Grammar School and the other has been manager of the Angles Theatre but is about to tour New Zealand for eight months, so the butchery business is not for them to continue the family line.

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Left: David and Christine Williams. Picture

G.W.Frank in Wisbech closing after 107 years of trading. Left: David and Christine Williams. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant


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Mr Williams and his wife Christine, 59, will continue to live above the shop in the Grade two listed building in the market place.

Founded in 1908 the butchery is popular for its home made pork products such as pork pies and haslet.

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It was taken over by Mrs Williams’ father from her great uncle in the late 1950s.

It was then passed to her brother. When he died aged just 20 years ago at the age of just 41, Mrs Williams took on the business and Mr Williams, who had worked as a manager in road haulage, left his job to help her run it.

“Christine started work in the shop when she was 13 and learnt all of her trade from skills passed down the family line,” he said.

“We don’t know yet what will happen to the shop when it closes but it will have to remain as a shop unit.

“It’s definitely the end of an era. Customers are upset about it, but we feel it is time to retire.”

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