Former Wisbech builder has his sick pay stopped despite suffering crippling pain from a car crash five years ago

A scan shows the injureis sustained by former Wisbech builder Colin Copeman

A scan shows the injureis sustained by former Wisbech builder Colin Copeman - Credit: Archant

A Wisbech dad has had his sick benefits stopped because he was told he was fit for work despite suffering such severe pain he says some days it feels like someone is pushing a screwdriver into his face and head.

A scan shows the injureis sustained by former Wisbech builder Colin Copeman

A scan shows the injureis sustained by former Wisbech builder Colin Copeman - Credit: Archant

Former builder Colin Copeman, 62, was in a car accident five years ago, and at first thought he had whiplash.

However, three days later the excruciating pain cut in and he began a five year nightmare of going back and forth to hospital consultants trying to find help.

Through what he says has been a series of hospital misdiagnosis at every turn, he is now left, not only in pain, but with no sick pay.

Colin said: “I used to be a busy builder, working out, living my life, things were good.


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“Now I barely get out, my kids have to help me out doing stuff. The pain is so bad there are times I don’t know what to do with myself.

“Nerve damage does not mean you are numb it means searing pain where you don’t know what to do with yourself, it is agonising.

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“Some days it feels like somebody is pushing a screwdriver in my head and face.

“How can I work like that? It’s a joke.”

Colin says he has a C1 C2 misalignment of his left lower occiput.

In layman’s terms this means his head is not correctly aligned onto his spine.

“And it is a nightmare,” he said. “I can barely turn my head left or right.

“I have been treated as I went private with a Dr Zhang in Norwich - without her I would still be struggling, even more than I already am.”

However, after going back and forth to medics, who he said did not listen to him correctly, he said his notes show he has mal-alignment of cervical spine which is the wrong diagnosis.

He says this can be seen from his hospital scans - yet they did not realise what was wrong - his is a much more serious condition, he says.

“I’ve become a patient expert as I have had to,” he said.

His full diagnosis is a C1-C2 misalignment with the left side lower occiput the (skull) and multiple prolapses between C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1, and damage to the occipital muscles left side.

A spokesman for the Department of Work and Pensions said: “The decision on whether someone is well enough to work is taken following a thorough independent assessment, including all available evidence provided from the claimant’s GP or medical specialist.

“Anyone who disagrees with the outcome of their assessment can appeal.”

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