It’s not been heard for forty years! Historic harp will be played by Chatteris girls in a fund raising day in Cambridge shopping centre

Chatteris harpists

Chatteris harpists - Credit: Archant

Two schoolgirls from Chatteris will be entertaining shoppers in Cambridge with a rare harp that has not been played for more than forty years to raise money for a diabetes charity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbJfGSL5TfI&feature=youtu.be

Sisters 12-year-old Bonnie Scott and Rosie, 10, are raising money as part of Diabetes UK week on Saturday June 20 by playing their harps together in the Grafton Centre.

Their mum Nyree said: “They really want to raise as much money as possible. They will make the trek to Cambridge with a very special harp called Little Rue, which is a rare 200 year old English Dodds pedal harp.

“The harp has just been restored and came home a fortnight ago. She hasn’t been played in public for probably 40 plus years.

“Last year they raised enough money to get a small harp made for an autistic child attending Peterborough Academy Special school.”


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The fund raising day was prompted by Bonnie’s best friend being a type one diabetic and their music teacher and grandma being type two diabetic.

Bonnie goes to Witchford Village College and Rosie to Lionel Walden Primary school.

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The young sisters have a string of success behind them including winning the Emile Lewis Rose bowl for the harp ensemble class in the Cambridge Competitive Music Festival earlier this year.

They have also competed in the Peterborough Music Festival and won the duet class receiving distinction standard and have medals from the East Anglian Harp Festival where both girls won trophies.

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