Life before the war

A GLIMPSE of rural life before the last war can be seen in an unusual exhibition at March Museum. The museum is putting on a display of advertisements from the Farmer & Stockbreeder newspaper and published between 1936 and 1939. The exhibits came mainly f

A GLIMPSE of rural life before the last war can be seen in an unusual exhibition at March Museum.

The museum is putting on a display of advertisements from the Farmer & Stockbreeder newspaper and published between 1936 and 1939.

The exhibits came mainly from Mrs Valerie Warner, whose husband Frank worked at Jimmy Kemps's dairy in Upwell Road who, after leaving school at the age of 14, took the papers for several years.

"Whilst at the dairy, Frank delivered milk to the townspeople twice a day, as there were no refrigerators in homes at that time," said Richard Munns, the museum's vice chairman. "The Farmer & Stockbreeder cost 2d per week but the price was increased just before the Second World War to 3d.


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"Mrs Warner passed the magazines to one of our members, Peter Wright, who thought they might make the basis of an interesting exhibition."

Margaret Bishop and Joan Munns have scanned some of the magazines and these will be displayed in the museum from May 5.

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Mr Munns said: "The advertisements cover a wide range of farming life just before WW2 and make very interesting reading, especially where 'cures' for a number of diseases are claimed.

"It was about this time that the horse was being replaced on a large scale by tractors or small lorries. The 'Goliath', a three-wheel lorry with 24 different body configurations and capable of carrying 14 - 19cwt, could be purchased for £188."

The museum is open on Saturdays and Wednesday from 10.30am to 3.30pm; entrance is free but donations are appreciated.

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