Lionel Walden Primary School in Doddington slips from 'outstanding' to 'good' in Ofsted inspection

PUBLISHED: 17:23 16 November 2017 | UPDATED: 17:23 16 November 2017

Lionel Walden Primary School in Doddington has fallen from outstanding to good in its latest Ofsted inspection due to “a lack of precise knowledge of national curriculum expectations”.

Lionel Walden Primary School in Doddington has fallen from outstanding to good in its latest Ofsted inspection due to "a lack of precise knowledge of national curriculum expectations".

Archant

Lionel Walden Primary School in Doddington has slipped from outstanding to good in its latest Ofsted inspection due to "a lack of precise knowledge of national curriculum expectations".

Ofsted praised headteacher Sally-Anne Barnard-Taylor, who “demonstrates a determination and relentless drive for improvement that is shared by all leaders and staff”.

The school was rated outstanding in terms of effectiveness of leadership and management, personal development, behaviour and welfare, and early years provision.

However, it slipped to good in terms of quality of teaching, learning and assessment, and outcomes for pupils.

The report states that “governors have an aspirational vision for the school and they provide high levels of challenge and support. They know the areas that need further development.

“Pupils feel safe and exceptionally well cared for by all staff, they behave with respect and consideration towards each other, and speak politely and confidently to adults” it continues.

“Pupils’ behaviour is outstanding and their attitudes to their learning are extremely positive.

“Pupils across the school are making good progress from their starting points, children have an excellent start in the early years and staff understands children’s needs and plan exciting activities that engage them and make them want to learn.

“Pupils who have additional needs make good progress; staff is aware of their needs and provide support promptly and effectively.

“Teaching is typically good and is characterised by high expectations, good subject knowledge and effective questioning” the report adds.

It however states that “a lack of precise knowledge of national curriculum expectations slows progress” and that “sometimes, assessment information is not used effectively to ensure that work is sufficiently challenging, especially for the most able.

“Outcomes in writing at Key Stage 2 show that some pupils do not produce work with the level of competence required to attain at greater depth”.

To improve further, the inspector suggests school leaders should use assessment opportunities to target individual needs, ensuring consistent understanding of subject content.

The school on High Street has 221 pupils aged four to 11 on the school roll.

The Ofsted inspection was carried out on October 10.

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