March Can’t Sing Choir: Group gets health kick and rediscover their voices

PUBLISHED: 10:06 05 December 2018 | UPDATED: 15:03 05 December 2018

They may be called the March Can’t Sing Choir but don’t believe the name - you need to take a listen. Picture: CLARE BUTLER.

They may be called the March Can’t Sing Choir but don’t believe the name - you need to take a listen. Picture: CLARE BUTLER.

Archant

They may be called the March Can’t Sing Choir but don’t believe the name -you need to take a listen to hear their passion and performance in full swing.

The group of more than 40 members meet every Wednesday night at Trinity Hall in March.

And it’s not long before entering the room that I am greeted with laughter, the clattering of tea and biscuits and that all important sound of music.

The choir were set up following a council initiative for Healthy Fenland in 2016 and since then they have gone on to prove that singing is a positive for the body and soul.

This week is their Christmas special – filmed exclusively for the Cambs Times – with members dressed in sparkly costumes, tinsel and Santa hats.

They may be called the March Can’t Sing Choir but don’t believe the name - you need to take a listen. Picture: CLARE BUTLER.They may be called the March Can’t Sing Choir but don’t believe the name - you need to take a listen. Picture: CLARE BUTLER.

Choir leader Sally Rose is eager to get everyone on top form, with a warm-up mixing nursery rhymes, chants and roars like Tarzan.

The songstress has been part of choirs in Wales and Ipswich and her love of music is clear in her encouragement.

“Come on men, I know you can sing like Pavarotti,” she says.

Their first rendition is to Ding Dong Merrily on High, before the kazoos are brought out for Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree accompanied by pianist Paul Hayward.

It’s a great buzz and proof that Fen people have a good set of pipes on them.

But this group has taken a healthy step in the right direction too, with members joining the gym and feeling less isolated in society.

“The feedback has been so positive, people come along and say that they feel so energised and revived afterwards,” Sally adds.

“Some of our members have even seen their lung capacity improved.

“First we do a warm up with funny voices and sing songs backwards and most of them have improved vocally.

“We then practice songs for our upcoming shows and, of course, have a tea break too.”

Throughout the year the choir has performed at various festivals across the district and are always happy to sing to residents at care homes.

Sally continued: “If you like singing, it doesn’t matter if you think you have a good voice or not, just come along and get involved.

“We are all a bunch of lovely people and everyone is welcome.”

Maria Oddy, 62, joined the choir after a difficult time and was eager to tell how it’s changed her life.

“I had lost my confidence but then I came along here and met these wonderful people and before I knew it my voice was back better than it was before and I’ve felt physically better too,” she said.

“Never be scared about taking part in something like this, life is too short and there are too many sad episodes in all our lives.

“Come along here and you will enjoy it.”

It was clear that this choir were not only a group of people who enjoy music but also a love of life.

Maybe the group should take the ‘t’ out of can’t, as from my experience, March can certainly sing.

Check out the Cambs Times during the festive period for a special performance from March Can’t Sing Choir.

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