Muscular dystrophy man told he must move out of his Wisbech home and into care home to save NHS money

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home and not in his bungalow. Left: Christine Morgan, Lee Thorne and Wendy Trowler. - Credit: Archant

A 45 YEAR old man with muscular dystrophy is appealing against a decision by NHS officials which will force him to move out of his Wisbech bungalow and spend the rest of his life in a care home in Peterborough.

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home and not in his bungalow - Credit: Archant

Lee Thorne, who has been in his purpose built bungalow for 13 years, says the decision would destroy his quality of life.

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home

Lee Thorne, muscular dystrophy sufferer is appealing against a decision for him to be in a care home and not in his bungalow - Credit: Archant

Mr Thorne, who enjoys days out to London, trips to the coast, concerts and museum visits with friends or carers, says being in a home would mean a future of “existing” instead of living his days to the full.

“My dignity has not been taken into account. This has been forced on me. I just want to live my own quiet life in the comfort of my own home,” said Mr Thorney of Victoria Road, who this week was allowed back to his bungalow for one day for the first time in 10 months.

Mr Thorne, who was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy at the age of six, lived independently with the help of social care until suffering a respiratory failure in July 2012.


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He was rushed to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital at King’s Lynn where he had a tracheostomy tube fitted to help with his breathing.

He suffered a chest infection and at the end of August was moved to Papworth Hospital where he remained until being taken to the care home in January 2013.

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Having the tube fitted means he cannot legally organise his own care and has been told by the NHS continuing care package team he needs two carers 24 hours a day, seven days a week

Living in the care home would cost £1800 per week. Staying in his bungalow with two 24/7 carers would cost £5,500 per week.

Mr Thorne said: “I only need two carers in the morning and night time to help me in and out of bed.

“The rest of the time one carer is enough, so the amount quoted is too high.”

His friends Christine Morgan and Wendy Trower are desperate for him to stay in his own home.

Ms Trower said: “They told Lee he would only be in the care home temporarily yet after four months they say he has to stay for good.

“Since being in the care home he hasn’t left his room.”

Ms Morgan added: “He loves his life at home and has everything he needs around him. The decision is totally wrong. ”

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