Campaign launches to dispel myths around becoming a police officer

Cheryl Lee (L) and Megan Gwynne (R) who successfully overcame self-doubts about whether policing was right for them.

PC Cheryl Lee (L) and PC Megan Gwynne (R) who successfully overcame self-doubts about whether policing was right for them. - Credit: POLICE

Fitness, age, height, and disabilities are all common issues that concern people considering a career as a police officer. 

Cambridgeshire Constabulary has launched a campaign to dispel some of the myths and misconceptions around what it takes to become part of the force.

It comes as the force continues to seek applicants for the police officer role, both under its degree holder entry programme (DHEP) and its police constable degree apprenticeship (PCDA) which opened on November 1. 

Both involve on-the-job training and recruits begin earning from day one. 

Therefore, the campaign will feature case studies of officers who successfully joined despite concerns. 

PC Megan Gwynne, who passed out in the summer, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at birth and then as a teenager developed cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. 

PC Megan Gwynne had worries about not having the strength to be an officer.

PC Megan Gwynne (pictured) had worries about not having the strength to be an officer. - Credit: POLICE

She also had worries about not having the strength to be an officer. 

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“I had some reservations because I'm only 5’1” and didn’t know whether I would be big or strong enough to effectively handle conflict and violent situations. 

“I was also hesitant about whether I would be accepted through the medical assessment, however, this proved to be nothing to worry about." 

She added: “There’s loads of women on shift who are my size and even smaller so there are no limits. 

“There is a place for everyone within policing and I think it’s important to have diversity and people from all different backgrounds."

Cambridgeshire Constabulary hopes the campaign will also increase people’s knowledge of the various routes into policing now available under the policing education qualifications framework. 

PC Cheryl Lee, is a single mum with two sons. 

PC Cheryl Lee (pictured) put a lot of pressure on herself to get everything right from day one.

PC Cheryl Lee (pictured) put a lot of pressure on herself to get everything right from day one. - Credit: POLICE

“When I started on division, I was a mixture of nerves and excitement but I kept busy by planning out the logistical side of things, particularly childcare and ensuring I incorporated sleep, as well as parenting. 

“I put a lot of pressure on myself to get everything right from day one, but I soon realised I would be supported.” 

For more officer case studies and information about the new routes into policing, visit Cambridgeshire Constabulary’s website

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