Name our crocodile competition launched by Wisbech pet store

Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture: Steve Williams.

Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant

A Wisbech pet shop has become the proud owners of a baby crocodile and they are hoping local school children will help name the reptile.

Karen D'arcy with the Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture

Karen D'arcy with the Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant

Andy Shortland, who manages Fangtasia Reptile Emporium owned by his wife Karen D’Arcy in Norfolk Street, said at around eight weeks old it is impossible to say whether the Spectacled Caiman is a boy or a girl.

But he is hoping that pupils at the town’s schools will rise to the challenge and give the crocodile, which will live permanently in the pet shop, a name.

Ownership of the crocodile, which will eventually grow to around 6ft long, is every reptile lovers’ dream and the arrival of the baby croc is the realisation of a long journey for Mr Shortland and his wife.

“It is not easy to get the necessary licence to own a crocodile. I have been in the business for 19 years and have all the necessary licences but it has still taken three years to get to this point. We have had to work very closely with Fenland District Council and with the Dangerous Wild Animals Licensing people. We have owned practically every other type of reptile but this is a dream come true for us,” said Mr Shortland.

Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture: Steve Williams.

Caiman crocodile at Fangtasia reptile shop in Norfolk street, Wisbech. Picture: Steve Williams. - Credit: Archant


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At the moment the baby crocodile eats insects but in six months’ time he will be eating mice, rats and chicks with a bit of fish.

Mr Shortland said Spectacled Caiman crocs are the third most aggressive breed and so he will be kept in a doubly secure enclosure at the pet shop, which also has high security.

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The name-a-croc competition will offer the winning child’s school a bug kit or something similar for their science department.

Fangtasia will be writing to all schools to let them know about the competition and how to enter.

In the meantime visitors to the shop can meet the crocodile who is now settling in well.

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