Sadistic female killer, who drove 100 miles to dump body parts at the March landfill site, dies in jail.

Karen Morris and Steve Parton

Karen Morris and Steve Parton - Credit: Archant

A woman who murdered her drug dealer before chopping him up and driving 100 miles to deposit his body parts at the landfill site in March ten years ago, has died in jail.

Karen Morris, who was serving 15 years for the macabre murder of drug dealer Nelvaughn Brade in 2004, died at the Royal Derby Hospital on Saturday aged 33.

The crack cocaine addict and her male stripper boyfriend, Steve Parton, were convicted in 2005 of killing Mr Brade, who was butchered and put through a household blender.

The pair then drove from Birmingham to the Fens where they dumped body parts in bin liners and flesh in two 25 gallon plastic oil drums at the March landfill site in Hundred Road.

They then went to King’s Lynn where they dumped further remains in a skip on a building site.


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The female killer, then 23, pleaded mental illness as her reason for savagely killing 22 year old Mr Brade but a jury at the time rejected her plea and she was sentenced to murder.

A court heard that Morris and Parton attacked the drug dealer while he was showering at the bungalow he shared with Parton.

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Parton shot him with a crossbow which narrowly missed his neck, before flooring him with several blows to the head with an axe.

Morris then stabbed him in the neck with a knife which was thought to be the killing blow.

The couple then dismembered the body and removed most of the flesh from the skeleton before putting it through a mincer.

They removed the palms on Mr Brade’s hands and the bottom of one of this feet in a bid to hide his identity.

Birmingham Crown Court judge Mr Justice Curtis said at the time that their crime had been fuelled by their addiction to “evil crack cocaine.”

Parton, who was 40 at the time, was jailed for 18 years.

An inquest into Morris’ death is due to be opened in Derbyshire.

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