Whittlesey charity No Gain No Pain UK donate six syringe drivers, over 250 handmade cloth bags and 18 carry cases to NHS

PUBLISHED: 11:22 16 June 2017

Lee Nicholls (NGNPUK), Esther McLaughlin (Oundle community nurse), Eileen Nixon (neighbourhood area team manager), Samantha Carter (NGNPUK), Rachael Watts (neighbourhood team manager) and Louise Nicholls (NGNPUK)

Lee Nicholls (NGNPUK), Esther McLaughlin (Oundle community nurse), Eileen Nixon (neighbourhood area team manager), Samantha Carter (NGNPUK), Rachael Watts (neighbourhood team manager) and Louise Nicholls (NGNPUK)

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Whittlesey charity No Gain No Pain UK have presented the Cambridge and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust with six syringe drivers, over 250 handmade cloth bags and 18 carry cases.

NGNPUK have been fundraising since 2014 and have so far donated 18 new machines to the local communities.

Through personal experience and research the charity identified the district nursing teams in the Peterborough area were sharing 19 machines amongst patients covered by 33 surgeries.

Louise Nicholls, of the charity, said: “It is something more personal to have next to the patient instead of a syringe driver in a plastic box. “The feedback we receive is that it brings a smile to people’s faces”.

“Each bag is donated to one person; they are not transferable due to the possibility of cross infection. Sadly, this means there is a constant demand”.

Sam Lawrence, of the charity, said: “We have an active Facebook page and website where people can keep up to date with our progress and events.

“We have found that the more people who understand what a syringe driver is about, really brings home the impact these magic machines make to the patients and their loved ones.

“The charity would love to hear from anyone who might be interested in fundraising or organising an event. Likewise, from any companies who can offer any help and assistance?

“We would also love to hear from any craft or sewing groups that might like to help make the syringe drivers bags, as there is constant demand due to their limited usability.”

A spokesman for the Cambridge and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust with Trust said: “The syringe drivers are small portable machines that provide patients a continuous stream of pain-relieving medication during end of life care. They can help patients remain comfortable at home with their families instead of having to go into hospital or hospice.

“The NHS uses a particular type of syringe driver, manufactured by just one provider, which costs £1,100 and must be stored in a £90 lock box to protect it and prevent it being tampered with.”

For more information visit www.facebook.com/ngnpuk/ or www.ngnpuk.weebly.com or email nogainnopainuk@gmail.com or call 07751 141005.

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