Whittlesey couple fears for childminding business after council planning blow

Childminding business in Glenfields Whittlesey. Refused retrospective planning permission

Childminding business in Glenfields Whittlesey. Refused retrospective planning permission - Credit: Archant

A couple that has run a childminding business looking after 18 youngsters at their home for the past 11 years has been threatened closure after complaints from neighbours about noise.

Childminding business in Glenfields Whittlesey. Refused retrospective planning permission

Childminding business in Glenfields Whittlesey. Refused retrospective planning permission - Credit: Archant

A couple that has run a childminding business looking after 18 youngsters at their home for the past 11 years has been threatened closure after complaints from neighbours about noise.

Three objectors raised their concerns with Fenland Council claiming the business generated “constant screaming and general noise” and high levels of “inconvenience” to other residents.

Neighbours also complained they couldn’t relax in their gardens and of congestion caused by parents dropping off and picking up their children.

Their views were supported by planning officers who said the semi detached house in Glenfields, Whittlesey, could no longer be considered residential.


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An application by Wendy and Andy Whitwell for retrospective planning consent was refused.

“In this dense residential area it is considered that such a use would be out of keeping with the surroundings,” concluded a council official who visited the house.

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There is insufficient parking for staff and parents visiting the house and the overall result was “major congestion is this tight cul-de-sac location” the officer said.

Mrs Whitwell told planners she was “surprised” to find a complaint had been made about them.

Since council officers visited in July, she said, parents had been issued with “parking restriction letters” and she pointed out that when she started the business she had sought advice but told planning consent was not needed.

Mrs Whitwell insisted she had been “very considerate to the neighbours” making sure children only go into the garden after 10am, keep noise to a minimum, and ask parents to park properly.,

“Many of the children have been with us since birth and their whole lives would be turned upside down if we couldn’t continue to provide the continuity of care for them and their families,” she said.

Mrs Whitwell says she will appeal to the district council to get them to change their mind: their application is supported by Whittlesey Town Council.

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