Whittlesey crackdown on speedsters continues

PUBLISHED: 08:08 24 February 2007 | UPDATED: 22:37 28 May 2010

THE crackdown on anti-social behaviour and speeding in Whittlesey and the surrounding villages is set to continue.

The decision follows the Whittlesey and district neighbourhood policing team s second panel meeting.

More than 80 residents and partner agen

THE crackdown on anti-social behaviour and speeding in Whittlesey and the surrounding villages is set to continue.

The decision follows the Whittlesey and district neighbourhood policing team's second panel meeting.

More than 80 residents and partner agency representatives attended the meeting to discuss policing priorities for the next three months.

Sergeant Dave Newnes, who leads the team, said: "Panel meetings are about including the public in the policing of their neighbourhood.

"Over the next three months the team has been tasked to look at anti-social behaviour, speeding and the anti-social use of mini-motorbikes."

At the team's last meeting the panel decided anti-social behaviour, speeding and alcohol related disorder should be tackled.

The team has spent the past three months working hard to make a significant impact in all three areas.

This has included issuing more than 100 FPNs (Fixed Penalty Notices) for traffic related offences, including 24 for speeding.

Sgt Newnes added: "We made it clear three months ago that we would not tolerate speeding in and around the town.

"Residents have decided they would like the team to continue to tackle this issue and we will therefore continue to carry out regular speed checks in the area.

"People who speed are not only risking their own lives but also the lives of others."

The team has also been working hard to crackdown on anti-social behaviour and alcohol fuelled disorder.

This has involved visits to local schools and youth clubs, high visibility patrols and partner agency operations.

One youth is currently on an ASBO (Anti-Social Behaviour Order) and officers are using the Guardian Awareness Program.

The scheme sees officers sending letters to parents and guardians following any anti-social encounter with a young person. If a third letter is sent officers will deliver it in person.

Sgt Newnes added: "Following a number of initiatives, including truancy patrols, test purchasing operations and high visibility patrols we have managed to reduce the number of reports of anti-social behaviour in the town.

"This work will continue as we work to actively pursue those involved in anti-social behaviour."

The team will now spend the next three months focusing on reducing crime in the three target areas.

Sgt Newnes added: "The team is committed to ensuring that Whittlesey and the surrounding areas are a safe place for everyone who lives in and visits them."

Chief Inspector Laura Hunt said: "Neighbourhood policing is about tackling the issues that are important to the public, through working in partnership.

"We will continue to carry out work to ensure that panel meetings are representative of the neighbourhoods and I would encourage anyone who would like to take an active role in the policing of their neighbourhood to get in touch with the team and attend their next meeting in three months time."

* Neighbourhood police officers are dedicated to working in designated neighbourhoods.

*Neighbourhood policing is about giving the public the opportunity to influence the service provided by police and partner agencies by getting involved in setting local priorities.


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