‘Family respect’ project launches to target domestic abuse

YMCA Trinity Group's 'Family Respect' project is one of three strands in part of a larger programme to target domestic abuse

YMCA Trinity Group's 'Family Respect' project is one of three strands in part of a larger programme to target domestic abuse across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. - Credit: YMCA Trinity Group

A charity has launched a ‘family respect’ project to help combat domestic abuse after more than 14,000 incidents were reported to Cambridgeshire Constabulary from 2019-2020.

Many of these were from parents or carers on the receiving end of abuse from young people. 

The project by YMCA Trinity Group, which is being funded by the Home Office ,focuses on working with children and young people who display abusive behaviours towards their parents or other family members. 

YMCA helps young people to realise their full potential on their journey to independence. 

Melanie Khan, family respect project manager at YMCA Trinity Group, said: “Across the UK and within our local communities, there is a rising number of young people carrying out acts of violence and abuse aimed at parents or other family members. 

“Abuse takes many forms, and the signs are often invisible to those on the outside of it. 

“Our family respect project can help those in these difficult positions. 

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“We take a systemic approach and work with the whole family to rebuild and repair relationships. 

She added: “Ultimately, we want to support our local community and transform young lives.” 

The project is being delivered by YMCA Trinity Group in collaboration with Cambridgeshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Darryl Preston and domestic abuse charity, Respect UK. 

Support to affected individuals will be given over a 13-week programme and will involve one-to-one sessions, collaborative family sessions, and cognitive behavioural therapy techniques. 

The project forms part of a larger programme to target domestic abuse across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

It focuses on three strands: ‘stalking and harassment’, ‘healthy relationships’ and ‘family respect’. 

Police and Crime Commissioner, Darryl Preston said: “As a former frontline police officer, I attended hundreds of domestic abuse incidents and know only too well the devastation this crime can cause. 

“Supporting children and young people who perpetrate domestic abuse will help protect victims from further violence and keep our communities safe."