Wetlands trust pick four iconic images to reflect their 50th birthday

PUBLISHED: 14:23 07 November 2020 | UPDATED: 14:47 07 November 2020

The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion.  HM the Queen watching a swan feed in 2008

The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion. HM the Queen watching a swan feed in 2008

Archant

Reaching 50 is always a milestone but the lockdown meant celebrations were quieter than they might have hoped for the Welney Wetland Centre.

The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion.  ,Aerial view of WWT Welney in July 2020The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion. ,Aerial view of WWT Welney in July 2020

“This time 50 years ago the Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) was donated 100 acres of land on the Ouse Washes in 1970,” said a spokesperson.

This was the mark of the second wetland reserve from the pioneer, Sir Peter Scott.

“At 50 years old, Welney Wetland Centre would like to pay tribute to the Scott family, staff, volunteers, Friends of Welney and all the supporters that have worked so hard,” said the spokesperson.

“Many have dedicated their lives which is why we are where we are today.

The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion.  The first �visitor centre� the houses on site and small car park.The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion. The first �visitor centre� the houses on site and small car park.

“To this day, we have connected well over a million people to our site for nature conservation, helping people to understand wetlands and why they are so important in our lives, especially in these turbulent times.

“Only this week, witnessing tens of thousands of birds returning from their Artic breeding grounds and the joy they bring, is one example why WWT is here.”

The centre felt these were highlights from 50 years:

1: Welcoming the Queen on two occasions to a swan feed where the centre lit up the area of water at night with a heated observatory.

The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion.  Archive images: Josh Scott first Welney warden feeding the swans, The Wildfowl Trust now known as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) celebrated its 50th birthday on November 7. They selected four archive images to reflect the occasion. Archive images: Josh Scott first Welney warden feeding the swans,

It enabled guests to enjoy the deafening sound of hundreds of wild swans of both the whooper and Bewick’s as they suddenly become tame to a barrow feed for everyone to enjoy.

2: Protecting over 1500 acres of grassland and enhancing wetland species making this a globally important site - and still finding new species to date.

3: Pushing boundaries by creating wetlands like Lady Fen and having an eco-visitor centre where you can view the fens and appreciate the iconic fenland skies.

4: What the centre describes as “the positive energy and support shown by everyone when the Ouse Washes floods so badly and having to deal with the changing seasons from climate change”.

Welney points out that their nature reserve is open during lockdown “so you can still enjoy winter wildlife in our wetlands”.

However, they must close hides, the animal collections, shops, cafes, and indoor areas in line with the government regulations.

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