7 of the most beautiful churches in Cambridgeshire

A historic church interior with stained glass windows.

We've put together a list of some of the most beautiful churches in Cambridgeshire. - Credit: K. Mitch Hodge on Unsplash

Throughout Cambridgeshire there are many spiritual and alluring places to visit, see and explore.

From green nature reserves and historic buildings to open fields and bustling towns, there are plenty of places to frequent and engage with.

However, some of the best places to learn about history, religion and local traditions are churches.

With many churches and cathedrals to choose from, we've put together a list of some of the most beautiful religious buildings from across the county.

1. St Andrew's Church, Soham

A large stone archway, with stained glass behind.

St Andrew's Church has been a place of Christian worship since 631 AD. - Credit: grassrootsgroundswell on Creative Commons

Described as "a diverse and inclusive community, with people of different ages, backgrounds and walks of life", St Andrew's Church has been a place of Christian worship since 631 AD.

The building, as it is seen today, can trace its origins to the 12th century when Hubert de Burgh, chief justice for England, granted Ranulph, the first recorded Vicar of Soham, lands in trust for the building of the Church of St Andrew. 

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Ranulph is credited with the design of the building, however additions and alterations were made in the 14th and 15th centuries.

The churches roof is decorated with carved angels, which have now lost their wings.

2. St Peter & St Paul Parish Church, Wisbech

A church, with grass and trees outside.

The St Peter & St Paul Parish Church is a Norman building with 900 years of history. - Credit: Google Maps

The St Peter & St Paul Parish Church in Wisbech is a Norman building with 900 years of history.

With a mission statement of "We pray to be generous and visible people of Jesus Christ", the church is part of the Church of England within the Diocese of Ely.

Within the church, stained glass windows, grand columns and traditional bench seating is found.

3. All Saints' Church, Huntingdon

A stone church in a pedestrianised area.

All Saints' Church features white walls and a dark, wooden, ceiling. - Credit: Google Maps

All Saints' Church is part of the Church of England, within the Diocese of Ely.

The location features white walls and a dark, wooden, ceiling.

Stone arches and stained glass windows add to the character of the church interior.

The exterior of the building features stone walls and a singular tower.

4. St Wendreda's Church, March

The church, on a road with trees and grass nearby.

St Wendreda's features a unique roof carved with angels and saints. - Credit: Google Maps

St Wendreda's Church in March describes itself as "an evangelical church with an emphasis on biblical teaching".

The building itself is known for its double-hammer beam angel roof, reportedly donated by William and Alice Dredeman in 1500.

Approximately 120 angels, and 19 saints and martyrs, are carved into the roof.

The church's font dates back to between 1100 and 1150, and was originally square but now features an octagonal design.

5. The Leper Chapel of Saint Mary Magdalene, Cambridge

The chapel, with a large group of people outside.

The Leper Church of St Mary Magdalene has been used as a bar and a warehouse during its history. - Credit: Google - By Owner

The Leper Chapel of Saint Mary Magdalene is "one of the oldest complete surviving buildings in Cambridge".

The Grade I listed, 12th century building was originally a chapel of isolation for those suffering with leprosy.

It's function has varied throughout its history, from being a church to a bar or a even a warehouse.

It is now used for community and cultural events.

6. St Mary the Virgin Church, Godmanchester

The church, with large trees and grass outside.

The St Mary the Virgin Church is mentioned in the Doomsday book (1086). - Credit: Google Maps

Mentioned in the Doomsday book (1086), the St Mary the Virgin Church in Godmanchester is a Grade I listed building.

The church is built in a mixture of gothic and early-English styles.

The building's chancel originates from the 13th century, while the nave and the spire were constructed in the 16th and 17th centuries respectively.

An organ resides inside the church, that was built in 1859. Due to the quality of craftmanship no major work has been carried out on the instrument since its creation.

7. Saint Mary's Church, Whittlesey

The church, with stone walls and trees nearby.

The church spire is nicknamed "high" by the locals. - Credit: Google Maps

Saint Mary's Church is located near Market Square in Whittlesey.

The first church on the site was consecrated in 1128.

Following a fire, the church was rebuilt over the next 250 years.

A tall spire can be seen from miles around, and is simply nicknamed "high" by locals.